Navy Museum, Simons Town

The SA Navy Museum has been housed in, and around, the original Navy Dockyard since 1810 when the Royal Navy moved its headquarters from Cape Town to Simon’s Town.

The museum was extended to become the three-storey building it is today. Throughout the years it served ships as a Magazine and Storehouse and also as a: Mast house, handling masts some 36 metres long. In addition it has been a Sail Loft, Boat Shed, Rigging Shop, Store for a Rocket Wagon and Lifesaving Apparatus and as St. George’s Church.

The SA Navy Museum collection, which is continuously being expanded, includes Ship and Submarine models, a life-size Ship’s Bridge, a life-size Submarine’s Operations and Control Room, Naval Guns, Torpedoes, an Anti-Submarine Mortar, Sea Mines, Mine-sweeping equipment, Diving equipment, Naval Small Craft, Naval Uniforms, Portraits of Naval Personnel, The South African Training Ship ‘General Botha’ collection and Much more.

The SA Naval Museum is a part of the South African Navy and is staffed by Naval Personnel and civilian volunteers. The Museum is supported, both financially and materially, by the South African Naval Heritage Trust and its Society. So if you are intrigued at all, it is definitely worth a visit and a good mooch around.

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